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Monday, August 19, 2019

The Tradition of Naming the Children #gagenealogy #georgiapioneerscom

The Tradition of Naming the Children

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland Austin

The ancestors named their children after relatives. A common method was to name the first child after the parents and/or grandparents of the couple, taking the first names. I had an ancestor who named his child George Thomas. I found the grandfather "Thomas" however, for a long while, the name "George" eluded me. It simply did not fit with any of the other family names. Finally, I discovered that it was the first name of the grandfather of the wife. In fact, George was used each generation during the 17th and 18th centuries. Every time I found another "George," he was the father of another fore bearer. The names of the other children were usually taken from more recent family members, such as brothers, sisters, or cousins. Sometimes a family surname was given the child as his first name. The naming of children is not written in stone, however. Yet, when the research gets tough, it is time to start thinking of certain as clues in the ancestry. I used this method when an ancestor named one of his children " Ramsey. " Decided to research all the Ramseys of that county. Turned up a Henry Ramsey who died in Henry County, Georgia, but who also lived in Abbeville County, SC and served in the Revolutionary War. He also had a daughter who married one of my distant ancestors. Never could prove it, but it looked like he probably married the other daughter because she is the one who named her child "Ramsey." This Ramsey followed the trail of my family from Abbeville to Georgia. Hmmm. This sort of digging is more tedious than other methods, yet sometimes reveals some pretty good clues. 




Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, August 12, 2019

Bibles are Lost to us Now #georgiapioneerscom #gagenealogy

Bibles are Lost to us Now

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland Austin

There are certain standardized references which we have lost. I am thinking of the family bible. When I was growing up during the 1940s it seemed as though everyone had a large family bible displayed in their home. In addition to the recording of Births, Deaths and Marriages there were cut-outs from old newspapers, usually pertaining to funerals of the relatives. I managed to collect a fair number of bible records (copied them) from persons who kept them during the 1930s and published them as follows: North Carolina-South Carolina Bible Records; Virginia Bible Records; Alabama Bible Records and Georgia Bible Records. All of these have been converted to databases and are available to members of Georgia Pioneers (home of 8 genealogy websites)



Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, August 5, 2019

There is Good Reason to Visit State Archives and Regional Libraries #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

There is Good Reason to Visit State Archives and Regional Libraries

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland AustinRegional Libraries and State Archives are still a good source for the researching genealogist. They have tons of information not available online. Certain public libraries are in the process of creating excellent web pages, they still operate under the budget system. Genealogists have always known this fact and donated materials when possible. You are likely to discover folder contributions inside filing cabinets as well as on microfilm. The old fiche system is going away. Yet, if you look around, libraries still have some fiche collections. People used to publish their books, then have the Mormon Church microfiche it. This is how such a vast collection of family genealogies amassed. Genealogists also took their genealogy to State Archives where it was microfilmed and then added to the general collection.  . . . more . . .



Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, July 29, 2019

The Errors of Yesterday #georgiapioneerscom #gagenealogy

The Errors of Yesterday

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland AustinThere were errors written in the genealogy books of former days. That is mostly because the old microfilm equipment could not read documents as distinctly as our modern technology of today. I recall the many illegible documents due to fading ink, poor storage and other reasons. The old equipment simply did not cut it! The improved microfilm readers of today such as Scan Pro which employs Windows into its system, read the documents with much more clarity. An good example is Forsyth County, Georgia records. Most of the will books were so faded that they were invisible on the page. A photographer's camera did a better job of scanning than the old microfilm machine. But still, the pages were difficult to read. The Scan Pro machine changed horrible to pages into an improved version. Unfortunately, many old court house records were put in cold-storage and this has always been a complaint of the genealogist. As the technology on our computers continues to improve, reading old documents will just get better! ___________________________________________________________________________ Images of Old Wills and Estates are available on (8 Genealogy Websites - includes records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia)



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Monday, July 22, 2019

Reasons to Examine Old Documents #genealogy #georgiapioneerscom

Good Reasons to Personally Examine Old Documents

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland AustinPeople write some interesting stuff in their wills! Before we had the Internet, a convenient method of discovering the heirs was to read "abstracts" of wills, estates, deeds and marriages which were published in book. This tremendous undertaking by the authors of genealogy was insurmountable in brilliance. It saved the researcher a great deal of time. But now that we have access Internet to full documents on Georgia Pioneers. Reading the entire document is a boon to genealogists for a number of reasons. First and foremost, the heirs are mentioned with the details of their specific inheritance, and relationship to the deceased. Second, some of our previous assumptions taken from the abstracts can be clarified. Third, we can discover new information. And fourth, all the details are included, some of which the abstracter did not include because it was not clearly discernible on the old microfilm equipment. _____________________________________________________________________________ Images of Old Wills and Estates are available on (8 Genealogy Websites - includes records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia).



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Monday, July 15, 2019

Imagine the Hard Times while Researching Ancestors #georgiapioneerscom #gagenealogy

Imagine the Hard Times while Researching Ancestors

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland AustinHave you ever imagined yourself as a Colonial citizen during the Revolutionary War? What if you were in occupied Savannah or Charleston? Food was rationed and the British Navy prevented you from transporting your crops to market. Merchant ships arrived with staples and supplies for the British Army. Your home was used to house British officers. They ate all of your farm animals and garden vegetables. You were observed by Loyalists who assisted the British. Your loved ones were out in the countryside fighting battles and skirmishes. They had joined for a three-month-stretch in order to return home and plant/harvest the crops. But the city was occupied and they could not return. So they signed up for another three-month term and were sent to fight other battles. This is the sort of activities which the genealogist should envision in order to track ancestors during one of the worst periods in history. A little imagination leads to the discovery of certain avenues of research, and records.
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Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, July 8, 2019

How Tax Records Help the Genealogist #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

How Tax Records Help the Genealogist

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

Tax RecordsThe tax digests in any given county in the State of Georgia provides essential data to the researcher as it lists all of the parcels of land which the person owned and in what counties. In Georgia, one can easily define the acquisition of properties from lotteries and the approximate date simply by noting the amount of acreage in the tax record. For example, the 1805 and 1807 land lotteries offered 202-1/2 acres in Baldwin and Wilkinson Counties; and 490 acres in Wayne County (1805). During 1820: Appling (490), Early (250); Gwinnett (250); Habersham (250) (490); Hall (250); Irwin (490); Rabun (490)(250) and Walton (250). The 1827 Land Lottery gave 202-1/2 acres in Carroll, Coweta, Lee, Muscogee and Troup. The 1832 lottery consisted of 202-1/2 acres in Cass (now Bartow), Cherokee, Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding and Union Counties. These are all Indian lands belonging to the Creeks and Cherokees. There was also a lottery encompassing North Georgia lands formerly owned by the Cherokees where people drew for 40-acre gold lots and one can assume the occupation was "gold miner." The best route to information is to first search the lottery records, then the tax digests in specific counties. In many instances, the names of waterways and creeks are provided, also the type of timber on the land, and the name of the adjoining landowner (if there was one). The digests were not indexed and are listed by districts. It is a good idea to search through the time period during which the families resided in that county. In the back of each book is a section of "Defaulters". That is important in discerning whether the family had moved on, or died. A good rule of thumb is that any person listed as a defaulter who was 60+ years of age, probably died in that county. A thorough study of the tax digests becomes essential especially if no other books survived for that county. This is where the tracts of land of each person having the same surname should be compared from one year to the next. For example, John Smith was listed for a number of years. Then, there was an administrator beside his name. (This is the approximate date of his death). Then, following through the years, another persons with the same surname has that exact acreage added to his accounting. This would be an heir, probably the oldest son. A good practice is to make copies of the digest for later comparisons between probable heirs, neighbors and friends. John Smith may appear many times, but how do you know if he is the same John Smith? The answer is to always take notes of the neighbors. Everyone listed in the same district are friends and relatives. It is the community as well as the history of the times!
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Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, July 1, 2019

Images Help Genealogists Read Records Online #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

Images Help Genealogists Read Records Online 

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

microfilmDid you know that it is far easier to read images of all documents on your computer than from microfilm? This is because the microfilm reader is using its limited technological capacity. Many of these old readers have seen their day! However, when a record is digitized for the computer, all of the latest imaging software is operative. For example, Adobe has improved over the years. The reader may now zoom in or out by using the plus or minor signs at the bottom of the screen. So much better than the old days of using a magnifying glass. Even faded and aged images are better interpreted on the computer. The Georgia State Archives where you can read old county documents yet remains open to the public only two days per week. A very stressed situation, I must say. But good news! Georgia Pioneers has digitized hundreds of thousands of the old wills and they are available here -- Index to Georgia Counties



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