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Monday, July 15, 2019

Imagine the Hard Times while Researching Ancestors #georgiapioneerscom #gagenealogy

Imagine the Hard Times while Researching Ancestors

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland AustinHave you ever imagined yourself as a Colonial citizen during the Revolutionary War? What if you were in occupied Savannah or Charleston? Food was rationed and the British Navy prevented you from transporting your crops to market. Merchant ships arrived with staples and supplies for the British Army. Your home was used to house British officers. They ate all of your farm animals and garden vegetables. You were observed by Loyalists who assisted the British. Your loved ones were out in the countryside fighting battles and skirmishes. They had joined for a three-month-stretch in order to return home and plant/harvest the crops. But the city was occupied and they could not return. So they signed up for another three-month term and were sent to fight other battles. This is the sort of activities which the genealogist should envision in order to track ancestors during one of the worst periods in history. A little imagination leads to the discovery of certain avenues of research, and records.
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Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, July 8, 2019

How Tax Records Help the Genealogist #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

How Tax Records Help the Genealogist

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

Tax RecordsThe tax digests in any given county in the State of Georgia provides essential data to the researcher as it lists all of the parcels of land which the person owned and in what counties. In Georgia, one can easily define the acquisition of properties from lotteries and the approximate date simply by noting the amount of acreage in the tax record. For example, the 1805 and 1807 land lotteries offered 202-1/2 acres in Baldwin and Wilkinson Counties; and 490 acres in Wayne County (1805). During 1820: Appling (490), Early (250); Gwinnett (250); Habersham (250) (490); Hall (250); Irwin (490); Rabun (490)(250) and Walton (250). The 1827 Land Lottery gave 202-1/2 acres in Carroll, Coweta, Lee, Muscogee and Troup. The 1832 lottery consisted of 202-1/2 acres in Cass (now Bartow), Cherokee, Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding and Union Counties. These are all Indian lands belonging to the Creeks and Cherokees. There was also a lottery encompassing North Georgia lands formerly owned by the Cherokees where people drew for 40-acre gold lots and one can assume the occupation was "gold miner." The best route to information is to first search the lottery records, then the tax digests in specific counties. In many instances, the names of waterways and creeks are provided, also the type of timber on the land, and the name of the adjoining landowner (if there was one). The digests were not indexed and are listed by districts. It is a good idea to search through the time period during which the families resided in that county. In the back of each book is a section of "Defaulters". That is important in discerning whether the family had moved on, or died. A good rule of thumb is that any person listed as a defaulter who was 60+ years of age, probably died in that county. A thorough study of the tax digests becomes essential especially if no other books survived for that county. This is where the tracts of land of each person having the same surname should be compared from one year to the next. For example, John Smith was listed for a number of years. Then, there was an administrator beside his name. (This is the approximate date of his death). Then, following through the years, another persons with the same surname has that exact acreage added to his accounting. This would be an heir, probably the oldest son. A good practice is to make copies of the digest for later comparisons between probable heirs, neighbors and friends. John Smith may appear many times, but how do you know if he is the same John Smith? The answer is to always take notes of the neighbors. Everyone listed in the same district are friends and relatives. It is the community as well as the history of the times!
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Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, July 1, 2019

Images Help Genealogists Read Records Online #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

Images Help Genealogists Read Records Online 

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

microfilmDid you know that it is far easier to read images of all documents on your computer than from microfilm? This is because the microfilm reader is using its limited technological capacity. Many of these old readers have seen their day! However, when a record is digitized for the computer, all of the latest imaging software is operative. For example, Adobe has improved over the years. The reader may now zoom in or out by using the plus or minor signs at the bottom of the screen. So much better than the old days of using a magnifying glass. Even faded and aged images are better interpreted on the computer. The Georgia State Archives where you can read old county documents yet remains open to the public only two days per week. A very stressed situation, I must say. But good news! Georgia Pioneers has digitized hundreds of thousands of the old wills and they are available here -- Index to Georgia Counties



Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, June 24, 2019

Why the War of 1812 is Rarely Discussed #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

Why the War of 1812 is Rarely Discussed

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

merchant marinerThe War of 1812 was mostly a maritime battle fought in the North Atlantic. During the first several months after war was declared, battles were centered around the Middle States. In fact, on October 14th, 1812, the senior naval officer at Charleston, South Carolina, wrote: "Till today this coast has been clear of enemy cruisers; now Charleston is blockaded by three brigs, two very large, and they have captured nine sail within three miles of the bar." Two months he expressed surprise that the inland navigation behind the sea islands had not been destroyed by the enemy, due to its of its lack of defense. In January of 1813, the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay was guarded by a ship of the line, two frigates and a sloop. A commercial blockade had not been established, yet the hostile divisions remained outside and American vessels continued to go out and in around Charleston. A Letter-of-Marque and Reprisal was a government license authorizing a privateer to attack and capture enemy vessels and bring them before the admiralty courts for condemnation and sale. This method of cruising on the high seas for prizes with a Letter-of-Marque was considered an honorable calling because it combined patriotism and profit. Otherwise, captured vessels were done so by "piracy" which was punishable by law. The privateer employed a fast and weatherly fore-and-aft rigged vessel heavily armed and crewed, and its primary objection was for fighting. There existed a robust trade with France by Letters-of-Marque for commercial vessels which carried cargo and guns. By February 12th of 1813, conditions grow worse. The commercial blockade was proclaimed and blockaders entered the Chesapeake while vessels under neutral flags (Spanish and Swedish) were turned away. Two Letter-of-Marque schooners had been captured, one after a gallant struggle during which her captain was killed. Nautical misadventures of that kind became frequent. On April 3rd, three Letters-of-Marque and a privateer, which had entered the Rappahannock, were attacked at anchor. The Letters-of-Marque had smaller crews and thus offered little resistance to boarding, but the privateer, having near a hundred men, made a sharp resistance. The Americans lost six (killed) and ten were wounded, while Britain had two killed and eleven wounded. Source: Sea Power In Its Relations to the War of 1812 by Captain A. T. Mahan, D. C. L., LL. D., United State Navy. (London, 1899) Protecting Georgia During the War of 1812 The Blackshear Trail The War of 1812 in Georgia The Role Georgia Military Forts Played During War of 1812 The Battle of Cold Harbour



Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, June 17, 2019

Tales of Woe #georgiapioneers #genealogy

Tales of Woe

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

ladder on roofOne can just about read the history of any given community by reading gravestones. The proximity of the dates of death, particularly of children and mothers, help to define epidemics such as measles, cholera, smallpox, diphtheria and tyhpus, to name just a few. American has gone through many medical transitions, from cures and vaccines to the discovery of new strands of virus. The health of a community helps to tell the story of families and answer "why?" to certain situations. My grandmother was cautioned by her mother not to consider a certain beau for matrimony because he had health issues. In those days, women were considering marriage as a life-time-experience and one in which the husband supported her needs. Reading the old newspapers helps to determine more. When a wife left her husband, he posted a notice in the newspaper stating that he was not responsible for her debts. Too, she returned to the home of her parents. If she was abused, it was the duty of a brother to confront the husband. This sort of behavior spread like wildfire, and sorely affection reputations in all facets of business. Because a bad marriage could disrupt the good reputation of families, the parents assisted in locating a proper husband. My grandfather was a good person, never ill a day in his life. But one day, he climbed up on the roof to make some repairs, and fell off. The result was that he died. That left my grandmother, a young woman in her early forties, a widow for the rest of her life! Daniel Bonnell was Executed for Robbery "Light Horse" Harry Lee died at Dungeness The Case of Hog Smith The Romance of John Wesley Thomas Jones of Wales Capt. John Collins of Acworth William Few Peter Gruber and Neighs Forced out of Austria There were Two Margaret Hollands Dr. N. G. Long He Came Over in a BarrelThe Heartbreak of George A. Benson of Lawrenceville The Old Woman and Toccoa Falls They Traveled Far in Search of a Home The Enduring Escapades of Thomas Ramsey Major James HicksJeremiah Lamar The Flemings of Sunbury Lorenzo Dow Smith Wilson Conner The Sad Tale of Every Cemetery Swedish Soprano If Only I Could Tell My Grandmother the Rest of the Story Grannie Stories told over Chicken Every Sunday Anthony Bonnell Old Dan Tucker



Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, June 10, 2019

A Wintry Day in Georgia #georgiapioneers #genealogy

A Wintry Day in Georgia

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland AustinSometimes the best information can be found in old cemeteries during winter. That is because the weeds are dried up thus making the stones more visible. This is a good time to search around for old sunken graves, and depressions in the soil. One February as the cold wind blew against my back, I examined the tombstones in the Davis Smith Cemetery at Brent, Georgia. I had visited there rather often, however, this time my eye caught sight of a sunken concrete slab. Turns out that the name and dates were quite visible, despite the fact that I had to scoop out some dirt. Turns out this was Jeremiah Smith, born 1795, brother of Davis Smith! This extra information helped me to locate the parents, and finally grandparents! . . . more . . .



Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Monday, June 3, 2019

Images of Dooly County GA Wills and Estates #georgiapioneers #gagenealogy

Dooly County Wills, Estates, Marriages

ByronvilleDooly County was created in 1821 by an Act of the General Assembly and was named for the famous Colonel John Dooly (1740-1780), who was killed at the Battle of Kettle Creek in 1780. The song Tom Dooly was written for him and lingers in Georgia's memory Hang down your head Tom Dooly, hang down your head and die The Georgia Land Lottery of 1821 distributed lands of the Creeks located between the Ocmulgee and Flint rivers at the signing of the Treaty of Indian Springs. Later, portions of Dooly County were used to create the following counties: Worth (1853), Wilcox (1857), Crisp (1905), and Turner (1905). Early Settlers: Levin Adams, Joseph Bridges, Ezekiel Butler, Brinkley Brown, William F. Bealle, Irwin Bullock, W. B. Cone, Wesley Calhoun, Robert Depree, Noah Daniel, Caleb Fullington, John Godwin, Jack Herring, Elbert Hodges, John Hammond, William P. Jordan, Donald Jones, William King, James Lester, Hugh McLain, Henry Mashburn, Henry Oliver, Moses Pipkins, Hardy Royal, Mathew Sheppard, John Truluck and Gideon Watson.

Dooly County Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Wills

Images of Wills 1847 to 1867

Names of Testators: Adams, John Q.;Adams, Leven; Adams, William;Bealle, James;Bealle, William;Bothwell, Davis; Bridges, Joseph;Bridges, William;Brown, Brinkley;Buckelew, James;Bullock, Irwin;Butler, Matthew;Cato, Benjamin;Collins, Henry;Culpepper, Joel;Daniel, Isaac;Daniel, Noah;Fenn, Elizabeth;Fenn, Henry;Gammage, James;Hammond, John;Harvard, Stephen;Higdon, Charles;Hodges, Elbert;Johnson, Solomon; Jones, Donald;Lasseter, Shemuel;Lester, James;Lewis, James; Lock, Joseph;Mayo, Harmon;
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Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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Friday, May 31, 2019

DeKalb County GA Ancestors -- See Names #georgiapioneers #gagenealogy

DeKalb County Wills, Estates, Deeds, Church Records, Cemeteries

Stone Mountain Grist MillDeKalb County was created in 1822 after the Muskogee (Creeks) Indians ceded the lands by treaty and was taken from Henry, Gwinnett and Fayette Counties. It was named for Baron Johann DeKalb, a German hero of the American Revolution. In 1853 Fulton County was created from the northern portion of DeKalb County. Many of the settlers to DeKalb County were in search of new lands and were farmers. When researching DeKalb County, Henry (the parent County) and Fulton Counties should also be researched. Unfortunately, the estate records do not begin until 1840. If you have an ancestor who resided within the boundaries of the present-day Atlanta, those records will be found in DeKalb County. Remember, the journey from Atlanta to present-day Decatur to file a deed, will, or other record was quite a trip.

DeKalb County Probate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Marriages

  • DeKalb County County Marriages 1885-1886 from newspapers

Maps

  • Map of DeKalb County County

DeKalb County Wills

DeKalb County Probate Records by Jeannette Holland AustinDeKalb County Probate Records by Jeannette Holland Austin comprizes the content of these records.
  • DeKalb County Wills & Estates 1841-1869
  • DeKalb County Wills & Estates 1870-1889
  • DeKalb County Wills & Estates 1890-1919
  • DeKalb County Appr. & Returns 1852-1858

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Index to Deed Book L 1846-1852
  • Index to Deed Book M 1850-1853
  • Index to Deed Book N 1852-1854
  • Index to Annual Returns, Appraisements, Inventories, Sales, 1842-1852
  • Index to Annual Returns, Appraisements, Inventories, Sales, 1852-1859
  • Index to Annual Returns, Appraisements, Inventories, Sales, 1858-1863
  • Index to Annual Returns, Appraisements, Inventories, Sales, 1863-1868
  • Index to Annual Returns, Appraisements, Inventories, Sales, 1868-1884

Deeds

  • 1846 to 1846, Book H

Miscellaneous Wills and Estates

  • Adair, Thomas O., estate
  • Adair, William, deed dated 1849
  • Adams, W. D., estate
  • Akin, Martha, estate
  • Allen, William, estate
  • Anderson, William C., estate
  • Argoe, Robert, estate
  • Armstrong, John, estate



Index to Georgia Wills and Estates

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