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Monday, December 10, 2018

Dahlonega Gold Mining #georgiapioneerscom #gagenealogy

Dahlonega Gold-Mining

Dahlonega Gold MineIf you see the word "miner" on the 1850 census as the occupation, what you have is a relative who was sniffing out the trail of gold discoveries in Georgia. Do not be surprised to notice that this adventurer moved about in the mountains of North Georgia. In Lumpkin County, the rush began in 1829 and spread rapidly throughout the region. In fact the word spread so quickly that newspapers caught wind of it. Of the uncounted gold mines which are found in this region, the most fruitful at the present times lies about twenty-five miles from here, in a northerly direction, and is the property of Mr. Lorenzo Dow Smith. And the success which has ever attended Lorenzo is worth recording.





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Thursday, December 6, 2018

Skirmish at Cow Creek #georgiapioneers

The Skirmish at Cow Creek

Cow CreekDuring August of 1836, the Creek Indians camped along Warrior Creek, Little River, Alapaha River and Cow Creek were fleeing into the Okefenokee Swamp. Their purpose was to join up with the Seminole Indians in Florida. On the 27th of August, the militia companies commanded by Colonel Henry Blair, Captain Lindsay and Captain Levi J. Knight, caught up with a band of Creeks at Cow Creek. At that time the creek was known as "Troublesome Ford" near Statenville. The skirmish lasted about ten or fifteen minutes, with the enemy being completely routed.  Echols County GA Genealogy Records



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Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Images of Cobb County Wills, Marriages, etc #genealogy #georgiapioneers

Online Cobb County Wills, Estates, Marriages, Divorces, Minute Books, Military, Newspapers

Pine Run Grist MillCobb County was formed in 1832 from Cherokee County and named in honor of Thomas Willis Cobb, U.S. representative, U. S.Senator and Supreme Court Judge who subsequently named the the city of Marietta after his wife. For a number of years white traders settlers encroached on Indian lands. Upon the signing of the 1832 Treaty to remove the Cherokees, settlers flooded the territory. The Cherokees were farmers and not surprisingly, not all Cherokees emigrated to Oklahoma and Kansas. Some of them obtained permission to remain in Cobb County which is reflected in the Dawes Rolls when people from Cobb, Forsyth, Lumpkin and Gilmer Counties made application before the Dawes Commission to prove Indian ancestry. Such proof was necessary in order to obtain free land in Oklahoma. Indian trails ran from the Alabama Road North through Bartow County and across the "Shallow Ford" in the Chattahoochee. The Second Georgia Land Lottery of 1832 parceled out land to settlement and the first towns of Marietta, Sweet Water, Buffalo Fish and Big Shanty. Big Shanty is remembered for sheltering Atlantans during the Battle of Atlanta which made the mad rush by railroad before General Sherman took the city. The railroad started its construction in 1836 when the State of Georgia began purchasing the right-of-way to build from the Tennessee River to the Chattahoochee River. In 1845 track was laid from Marthasville to Marietta with a stop over for water at Moon's Station in Kennesaw. During the War Between the States the earliest court house records were torched by Sherman. Earliest settlers were: Cloud, Lemon, Collins, Guess, King, etc. 

NOTE: The Cobb County records have not been microfilmed and are not found at the Georgia State Archives. 

Probate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Marriages

  • Marriages 1865-1937, Groom Names A to Z
  • Marriages 1869-1886, from newspapers
  • Divorces 1885-1886 from newspapers

Online Images of Wills 1857-1904

Adams, Hiram M.;Alexander, John Y.; Alexander, Peter W.; Alexander, Robert G.; Allen, Ransom A.; Allgood, John W.; Anderson, Charles H.; Anderson, Henry S.; Anderson, Henry S.; Anderson, William P.; Armstrong, William; Atkins, Emeret; Austin, William A.; Avery, George S.; Awtrey, Merrill C.; Awtry, Sarah; Baggett, Burton; Bagwell, John B.; Baker, Francis J.; Barrett. Charles; Barrett, John; Baswell, William P.; Bates, Mathias; Bellenger, John; Bennett, John H;. Bingham, S. A.; Bolan, Matilda C.; Bonner, Claborn; Boyd, David; Boyd, Robert M.; Bradley, Gordon M.; Branan, Sarah; Brinkley, Emeline F.; Brockman, John B.; Brockman, John B.; Brown, Absalom; Brown, James R; Brown, James Welsman; Brown, Silas; Bullard, Robert L;. Buttolph, Wallace S.; Bunn, Marcus; Burnap, Gaines C.; Bush, Asa; Byrd, Sarah N.; Cargile, James; Carrie, Gaspard T.; Chastain, Sarah C;. Chastain, Sarah C.; Cheney, Andrew J.; Cheney, W. S.; Clark, Jane; Clarke, Susan Stone; Clay, Thomas C;. Cochran, S. R.; Cole, Henry G.; Cook, Francis; Cooke, N. M.; Cortelyon, Peter R.; Couper, Hannah Page; Cowen, Stephen D.; Crockett, M. Ella; Crosby, Charles M.; Covington, W. H.; Cumming, William Henry; Curry, Rebecca; Daniell, Robert; Darby, John; Darby, Mary Francis; Davis, Gary; Delk, Jackson; Delk, W. J.; Dempsey, Lazarus; Dickeson, John;  ,,, more names ....



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Monday, December 3, 2018

Strangers No More #georgiapioneerscom #gagenealogy

Strangers No More

Boxwoods at Westover PlantationHow exciting it is to locate an old photo of the ancestors. But there is more to come for the genealogist who digs deeply into the past. A visit to the old farm place in the countryside offers a sense of their lifestyle and sacrifice to the American way. Your ancestors were ambitiously unselfishly valiant people, and proved it by forging an economy out of a new wilderness country. I hope that you take the time to walk across old pastures and dirt roads, locate rural church yards, and speak to the older generation still in the vicinity. Next, introduce yourself to them by examining deed records and take note of the legal description which provides the land lot number and acreage. A county map from the tax accessor's office will help you to find the exact spot. Also, while you are in the neighborhood, observe how the land itself seems to be missing the old generation who planted the gardens and fruit trees. How old are some of those trees? As people moved from place to place, they took seeds of trees and favorite plants. Remember, that just as Sir Walter Raleigh introduced? the potato to English soil, that English immigrants also delivered the beautiful boxwood seedlings to Virginia plantations where they continue to flourish in grand beauty today.





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Finding the Path Across the Genealogy Maze #georgiapioneerscom #gagenealogy

Finding the Path Across the Genealogy Maze

mazeHave you ever worked one of the maze puzzles in the Altheimer's books? Once inside the maze, the idea is to find a path out. Actually, it is a good exercise for the researcher who spends years attempting to solve complicated genealogies. We expect to find marriage records, for example, but discover that many county records did not begin requiring this filing until the 1900s. But we are inside the maze and must pause to examine all of the possibilities of exit. In seeking the obvious exit, we miss tiny details which lead to answers. For example, did you realize that the people buried in the old part of a cemetery are "the neighborhood?" It is these tombstones which provide answers. Had you researched the local deed records, wills and estates, you might recognize some of the names. In other words, you are looking at the neighbors, friends and relatives of your ancestors. A closer look at the old section might turn up the husband's of daughters. Look closely and write down every one's name. Notice when they include a maiden name. Example: Mary Jones Smith. Gosh, Mary's parents are probably buried close by. And an examination of old wills and estates might help identify if Mary Jones belongs to your family. Thus, just as we examine every outlet in the maze, we identify every possible relationship. 





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Friday, November 30, 2018

Barnsley Manor in Bartow County

Barnsley Manor

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The original manor house (now Barnsley Resort) was built in the style of an Italian villa by Andrew Jackson Downing. Before it was completed, the wie of Godfrey Barnsley fell ill and died. Barnsley suspended its construction but resumed it later when he said that he felt her presence at the site telling him to finish the house for him and his children. During the War Between the States, the mansion was the site of a battle, and much of the house and Barnsley's possessions were ransacked by the Union Army. Barnsley lost his fortune during the Civil War and later moved to New Orleans where he died in 1873. His descendants continued to live at Woodlands until the roof of the main house was blown off by a tornado in 1906. Barnsley's granddaughter, Miss Addie, and her family who were living there at the time, moved into the kitchen wing and the main house was never restored, and eventually fell to ruins. In 1988 Prince Hubertus Fugger purchased the estate and began a major project to stabilize the ruins and rescue and restore the gardens.



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Monday, November 26, 2018

Peter Gruber and Neights were Forced Out of Austria by the Catholic Archbishop

Peter Gruber and Neights were Forced Out of Austria by the Catholic Archbishop

TaxenbachThe Catholic archbishop of Austria ordered all protestants out of the country in 1722. They had two weeks to pack up and leave. Several hundred Austrians roamed about Europe searching for homes. When General James Oglethorpe learned of the persecution, he welcomed these people into Georgia. However, by then, the numbers of homeless was diminished as they situated themselves around Europe, with only about 100 people remaining to emigrate. Maria Kraher emigrated to Georgia from Austria with her first husband, Hans Mosshammer. After he died, she was married to Peter Gruber in Ebenezer, Georgia, and after his death, married a third husband, Charles Floerl. Peter Gruber was born in Taxenbach, Berchtesgaden, Germany. Later on, the name was changed to Groover, especially as descendants moved into Bulloch County.





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Monday, November 19, 2018

Philomath, Georgia #georgiapioneers #gagenealogy

Philomath, Georgia

Philomath Presbyterian ChurchAfter the Revolutionary War as veterans took up land grants in Oglethorpe County, large cotton plantations emerged and helped to build a community. The Philomath Presbyterian Church was established ca 1829, its name having been suggested by Alexander Stephens who noted that the residents were supportive of the Reid Academy and had a high regard for education. Hence, "Philopmath", meaning "love of knowledge." 





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