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Monday, March 25, 2019

The Threat of Castillo San Marcos

The Threat of Castillo San Marcos

Castillo de San MarcosThe Spanish held Northern Florida beginning in 1565. On September 8th, Pedro Menendez de Aviles landed on the shore of what is now called Matanzas Bay and began the founding of the Presidio of San Agustin. Later the settlement was called St. Augustine, Florida. The castle or fort was constructed on the site of an ancient Native American village, and near the place where Ponce de Leon landed in 1513 in search of the legendary Fountain of Youth. General James Edward Oglethorpe held a siege against the fort in 1742, however, cannon balls were unable to penetrate the well-secured stone fortress and a fleet of ships promised by Governor Johnson of South Carolina designed block the harbor became stuck on a sandbar. Meanwhile, the regiments of Oglethorpe suffered from yellow fever and dysentery, and Oglethorpe himself had to be transported on a litter back to Ft. Frederica. The Spanish waited two years before they retaliated.



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Monday, March 18, 2019

Battle of Bloody Marsh

Battle of Bloody Marsh

Battle of Bloody MarshBattle of Bloody Marsh When an English trader by the name of Jenkins violated a trade agreement with Spain, and the ear of Jenkins cut off as an example, a war was declared. General James Edward Oglethorpe was promoted to the office of General and given the assignment to fight the Spanish in Northern Florida. The war is known to historians as the "Battle of Jenkins Ear". On July 7, 1742, several Spanish vessels landed on St. Simon's Island and commenced walking towards Ft. Frederica expecting to fight European-style in an open field. Meanwhile, the highlanders hid in the woods and attacked guerrilla-style in an open marsh. This battle is known as the Battle of Bloody Marsh. Although the English were significantly out numbered, the confusing guerrilla tactics of the Scottish Highlanders, resulted in an important English victory. The Spanish galleons left Georgia and sailed for Cuba. Although General Oglethorpe won the land war with Spain, he had been in the colony for fifteen years and by the time that he returned England the victory went ignored by his contemporaries. 



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Friday, March 15, 2019

Images of Brooks Co. GA Wills, Estates #gagenealogy #georgiapioneerscom

Brooks County Wills, Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Confederate Pensions

Brooks CountyBrooks County was created in December of 1858 from Lowndes and Thomas Counties. The first court session was held in the home of Thomas Folsom in Quitman. Later in 1859, work began on a court house, however was not finished until 1864. One of the earliest settlers was John Groover, a descendant of Peter Gruber, Saltzburger to Georgia with Oglethorpe, who settler in Ebenezer, Georgia (Effingham County) and whose descendants went to Bulloch and Brooks Counties. Other early settlers were: Levin Arrington, Benjamin Bentley, William Colter, William Dinson, John Edmonson, William G. Hunter, Robert Peacock, Daniel McRae and Leary Stanley.

Wills and Estates available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Wills, Book I, 1860 to 1899
  • Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Vouchers, 1859 to 1863
  • Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Vouchers, 1863 to 1865
  • Will Book I, 1860 to 1899
  • Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Vouchers, Book D, 1869 to 1872

Online Images of Last Wills and Testaments 1860 to 1871

  • Bentley, Benjamin
  • Copeland, L. J.
  • Coulter, William
  • Denson, William
  • Dixon, Pleasant
  • Edmonson, John
  • Edwards, Samuel
  • Gorno, Joel
  • Groover, Charles
  • Groover, John (Estate) 1857-1860
  • Groover, Joshua
  • Hunter, William
  • King, Nancy
  • McCardle, James
  • McLeod, Norman
  • McMullen, John
  • McRae, Daniel
  • Mullen, James
  • Mullen, James
  • Oliff, Elizabeth  . . . more . . .



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Monday, March 11, 2019

What the Genealogists Should Search for in Cemeteries #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

What the Genealogist Should Search for in Cemeteries

Oakland CemeteryA large percentage of the population was buried without tombstones at any given era of time. For the few families who purchased a plot, fenced it off and buried all the family members inside, we owe a hearty "thanks!" Sometimes, when visiting a cemetery, another family member will identify an unmarked grave, or one marked with "rocks." People who have resided in small towns all of their life seem to know who is buried where. The reason is that they had some connection with the family and, in passing, the names on stones are discernible. Barring having all of this help, one must examine each grave site, the stones or rocks, even sinking of the terrain for clues. During the 1900s small memorials upon which inscriptions do not easily survive the elements was generally placed over small children and infants. Slate tombstones easily break. One should dig around in the dirt where there are broken slate stones. The reason is that the top portion could be under the first layer or two of the dirt. Is the cemetery one which may have been the old section of a church which is still standing? A question to ask the neighbors is whether a church once stood on the site. 



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Friday, March 8, 2019

Images of Bibb Co. GA Wills, Estates #gagenealogy #georgiapioneerscom

Bibb County Probate Records and Genealogy

Macon, Georgia

Bibb County was created on Dec. 9, 1822 from portions of Jones, Monroe, Twiggs and Houston Counties. It was named for Dr. William Bibb, who was the first elected governor of Alabama. Dr. Bibb lived in Elbert County, and served in the U.S. House of Representatives in the U.S. Senate. He was appointed governor of the Territory of Alabama in 1816 and became the first elected governor of that state. In 1823 Macon was incorporated; named after Senator Nathaniel Macon of North Carolina. Researchers in Bibb County should also research the Jones County Records.

Bibb County Genealogy and Probate Records available to members of Georgia Pioneers

Abstracts of Wills

  • Wills 1823-1855
  • Wills 1851-1864

Online Images of Wills 1823 to 1840

Testators: Asbury, Jonathan; Beall, Robert Augustus; Burnett, John; Burton, Robert ;Chambless, Henry; Church, Redman; Crockett, David ;Cutland, Redden; Daniel, William; Darragh, Archibald; Dixon, Thomas ;Fluker, Baldwin; Fort, Robert; Godfrey, Francis; Harrell, Hardy ;Howard, John; Huff, Edward; Jemison, Henry ;Jeter, Andrew; Johnston, William; King, John; Lamar, Benjamin; Lanier, John; Napier, Thomas; Nixon, William; Owens, Benjamin; Rogers, William ;Sapp, Henry; Scott, John ;Sigueux, Peter ;Smith, Henry ;Smith, James ;Summerlin, Sarah ;Tharp, John; Victory, Thomas ;Weed, Joseph ;Wells, Nicholas ;Williams, John; Williams, John D.

Online Images of Bibb County Wills 1851 to 1865

Testators: Alexander, Elam;Allen, David;Bailey, James;Bailey, John;Ballard, C. M.;Blackshear, Albert;Blake, Eleanor;Bond, Joel;Bond, Joseph; Bonds, Penelope;Brewer, Edward Ebenezer;Brown, Turner;Busbee, W. R.;Boren, Alfred;Bowman, John;Brown, Eliza;Campbell, Watson; Carey, Martha Ann;Castlen, John;Champion, Elizabeth;Colbert, Frederick;Coleman, Robert;Collins, Charles;Collins, Robert; Collins, William; Cray, Mary; Damour, James;Daniel, Clarissa; Dean, William;Dempsey, Dermot;Dillard, Colin;Dillard, Olive; Eaves, John;Ernest, Asa;Evans, Rufus;Farrell, John;Feagin, Robert;Franklin, Marcus;Freerman, Robert;Gamble, William;Gilbert, Edward;Gorman, Thomas;Grierson, George;Griffin, James W.;Griffin, Larkin; Graybill, Midas;Groce, Margaret; Hazlehurst, Robert;Hughes, Frances;Huguenin, Edward, Colonel; Huguenin, Edward;Huguenin, Julia;Hunter, George R.;Irwin, John; Johns, Isaac;Johnson, Henry;Johnson, William J.;Jordan, Absalom; Kearney, Arthur;Kelly, Francis;Kelly, Julia;Kenedy, Nancy; Kilpatrick, William;Kunz, John Michael;Lamar, John;Lamar, John B.;Leslie, Ann;Lunsford, Priscilla;Malden, Caleb;Malone, Cherry; Massey, William;Mathews, Martha;May, Benjamin;McCall, Eleazer; McEver, Robert;McGuire, Martha;McMichael, John;Mitchell, Alexander;Munroe, Nathan;Newsom, Henry;Newsom, Henry (2);Norman, Sarah;Parker, Burwell;Peterson, John;Powers, Abner Parrott; Powers, Julia;Pye, Andrew;Raines, Cadwell;Ramsey, Mary;Rea, James;Reynolds, S. O.;Roach, . . . more . . .



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Thursday, March 7, 2019

Images of Berrien County GA Wills, Estates #gagenealogy #georgiapioneerscom

Berrien County Wills, Estates, Marriages


Berrien County

Berrien County was created in 1856 from Coffee, Irwin, and Lowndes counties. The county was named for US Senator, John McPherson Berrien, who also served as Andrew Jackson's Attorney General. The old Coffee Road was one of the State's earliest post roads and was used as early as 1823 to transport crops into Florida. Earliest Settlers: Amos Bullard, Wilie Clements, Henry Hutchinson, James Goodman, Dr. William Harrell, John Lee, Thomas Mobley, John McDermits, and Thomas Ray. 

Berrien County Court HouseProbate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers 

Online Images of Will Book A (1855-1909) 

Testators: Boyt, William;Brinn, J. W.;Brown, John;Carroll, Jessie;Clyatt, Martin;Connell, James;Connell, John;Connell, John E.; Cudney, George;Everet, Phoebe;Garrett, Frances;Giddens, William;Griner, Daniel;Hall, John;Harrell, William;Henderson, Susan;Hester, Jane;Hutchinson, Henry;Kenny, Mary;Lamb, William;Lovitt, Joshua;Lovitt, W. B.;McDermit, John;McMillan, John;Mobley, Thomas;Myers, Susanna;Nicholson, J. L.;Peeples, Lewis;Powell, Mary;Powel, T. W.;Ray, John;Ray, Thomas;Shaw, Jeremiah;Sinach, William;Sirmons, Charlotte;Sutton, John;Tucker, Richard;Tygart, William;Watson, Moses; Williams, E. J.;Williams, James;Williams, Sampson 

Images of Will Book B (1909-1956)

Testators: Berrien County Will Book B, 1910 to 1856: Albritton, Edwin; Albritton, M. E.; Alexander, Jean and Marian; Brown, John; Brown, Sarulue; Buckholts, Peter; Buie, W. D.; Burkhalter, Mattie; Bussey, Eugene; Coombs, Richard; Darsey, J. D.; Duane, Millard; Futch, Malissa; Gaskins, Bart; askins, Bates; Gaskins, Fannie; Gaskins, Mattie; Gaskins, Marcus; Gaskins, Wycliffe; . . . more . . .



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Monday, March 4, 2019

A Midnight Duel

A Midnight Duel

dancing"I remember it as though it was yesterday, the march of Hill's corps along the winding Shenandoah, up to the famous Luray gap. Who could ever forget that march? The road winding with the beautiful river, and overhung with a majestic chain of Blue Ridge mountains, while across the crystal water the magnificent valley, with its charming cottages dotting the bounteous land with white-like balls of snow robed in flowers. But the most engaging and lovely objects paled into significance beside the peerless women of this blessed country, and you may well believe that when the camp was struck that the soldiers lost no time in making their way to the surrounding cottages. Soon the music of the violin was heard, and the shuffling feet kept time to the music, while, for a time, the soldier's face was lit with old time joy. At one of those cottages the belle of the valley reigned supreme, while several southern soldiers vied with each other in paying homage to the queen. Among others were two young soldiers, one from Georgia and the other from Mississippi; who were specially energetic in their attentions, and so marked had this become that those present watched the play with constantly increasing interest, fulling believing that both exhibited a case of love at first sight. The surmise on the part of those present was only too true, as the tragic event which followed fully proved. The Georgian seemed to have the lead on the Mississippian, and when the dancers were called to take their places, he led the belle of the valley to a place in the set. At this point the Mississippian was seen to approach the couple and heard to claim the lady's hand for the dance. An altercation ensued, but both were cool, brave soldiers, two of the best shots in the army, who did not believe in a war of words. So it was ended by the Georgian dancing with the lady and the significant remark of the Mississippian that "I will see you after this set." When the dance was over the Georgian was seen to seek the Mississippian, and together they called each a friend from the crowd and departed. When outside, both claimed that an insult had been passed, which could only be wiped out in the blood of the other, and that a duel to the death should be arranged at once. A full moon was just appearing above the tops of the surrounding forest, and I tell you this talk of blood in the silence of the night was anything but pleasant. No argument, however, would avail with these men, so it was arranged that the duel should take place at the top of the Blue Ridge, near the center of the road that passes through the gap; that the weapons should be pistols at fifteen paces, and to fire at or between the words one, two, three, firing to continue until one or both were dead. The point was reached, the ground measured off, and the men took their positions without a tremor. The moon shed its pale light down on a scene never to be forgotten. A moment or two and the\ silence was broken by the signal: one, two three. At the word one the report of two pistols rang out on the midnight air, but the principals maintained their respective positions. The left arm of the Georgian was seen to drop closer to the side, but the Mississippian was immovable, and still held his pistol to the front. Again, a pistol shot was heard, coming from the Georgian, and the Mississippian still held his position, but he did not fire. The Georgian protested that he had not come there to murder him, but no answered was returned. The Mississippians second approached his principal and found him dead, shot through the eye on the first discharge of the weapons. Death it seems has been instantaneous so much so as not even to disturb his equilibrium. I may forget some things, but the midnight duel on the top of a spur of the Blue Ridge, with its attendant circumstances, is not one of them." Source: Written by an anonymous Confederate veteran. Published in The Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, 26 January 1885. 



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Thursday, February 28, 2019

Images of Bartow Co. GA Wills, Estates #gagenealogy #georgiapioneerscom

Bartow County Wills, Estates, Marriages, Homesteads

Bartow CountyBartow County was formed in 1832 from the original Cherokee County. It was first called Cass County. The county seat is Cartersville.

Genealogy Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Marriages

  • Index to 1869 to 1876
  • Index to 1874 to 1882

Online Images of Bartow County Wills 1836-1856

Testators: Adair, Samuel;Alexander, Thomas;Bailey, Joshua;Baker, Charles;Bowman, Vincent;Brogden, Wiley;Carpenter, Thomas;Chandler, Abraham;Durham, William;Ellis, Standford;Furr, James;Gordon, William;Gray, William;Guyton, John;Harber, John;Hardin, John;Hardin, John, Sr.; Hargrove, Zachariah;Harris, Thomas;Harrison, Benoni;Hawks, Chester;Hipps, Joseph;Hood, Caleb;Jackson, James;Jackson, Mark;Johnson, Mark;Kerr, Lucy;Lackey, Robert;Lewis, John; Lyon, Nathaniel;McAdams, Thomas;McBrayer, Martin;McReynolds, Ferdinand;Millican, John; Moore, Gabriel;Murphey, Roger;Oglesby, Lindsay;Pinson, Charles;Reynolds, Benjamin;Robinson, Mary (deed);Russell, George;Smith, John;Smith, Nancy;Smith, Thomas Spencer, Levi;Spriggs, Gilead;Stallings, James;Steelman, William;Stevens, Thomas;Stidham, Martin;Stovall, James;Stovall, William;Talbert, James;Underwood, George;Upshaw, James;Upshaw, John;Wallraven, John;Williams, Margaret 



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